Downtown San Diego Growth

I marvel at the transformation of downtown in the last decade. Once a sleepy little town, downtown San Diego is vibrant with activity. As the economy flourished in the 2000s, so did downtown’s development. With recent growth came residential high rises that beautified our skyline and contributed to the live/work community we know today. In fact, the boom began in 2001 and is responsible for approximately 80% of downtown’s residential buildings, constructed between the years of 2000 and 2008. They are a combination of low, mid, and high-rise buildings.

Downtown’s residential development began with two low-rise buildings, Park Row (1983) and Marina Park (1984). These two communities are two and four stories high, lushly landscaped with beautiful gardens and outdoor walkways. Both are adjacent to Pantoja Park, a favorite of the locals. Next came two high rises, the Meridian (1986) encompassing 172 elegant residential units, and Harbor Club (1992) with twin towers 41 stories high, built on downtown’s “front row”. What followed were two mid-rises, Watermark (1992) and City Front Terrace (1994). An elegant beauty, Watermark is constructed of concrete and steel, unique for a mid-rise. A portion of City Front Terrace is built as part of the historic Soap Factory warehouse, ten stories high, and all brick! All six communities are built within the Marina District, and close walking distance to the biggest attraction in downtown at the time, Horton Plaza shopping mall (1985).

Some of the first construction of downtown was the El Cortez (1926) on Cortez Hill, and Samuel Fox Lofts (1929) located in Gaslamp, the heart of the city. Originally built as a hotel, the El Cortez is now a historic landmark, and sold as condominiums. Samuel Fox Lofts rarely has condominiums available for sale. While all of these developments are close to downtown’s core business district, later developments (2000s) pushed the outer edges of the city, extending downtown’s neighborhoods to Columbia and East Village. Two recently built residential communities in Columbia are Sapphire(2008) and Bayside (2009), both luxury high rises offering resort-like amenities, concierge service, pool, spa, sauna, library, fitness center, wine room, and 24 hour security to name a few.

Many downtown high rises have built-in commercial/retail space, separated from residences with street level entrances. In these commercial/retail spaces, you’ll find businesses that include corporate offices, restaurants, hair salons, and cafes. Horizons, Pinnacle, Alta, and the Meridian are examples of residential communities that have storefront businesses as part of their buildings. For example, Pinnacle is home to well known Richard Walker’s Pancake House.

Whichever community you choose to live and/or work, you’ll find convenient shopping, available services, parks, recreation, theaters, and restaurants all within short walking distance. Whether it’s a stroll along Market where you’ll see tree lined streets decorated in blue lights during winter holidays, lounging in Children’s Park with its elaborate water fountains, attending a baseball game at Petco Park, or taking a yoga class, you’ll love and feel the energy from this blossoming urban city.

Information on Becoming an Internet Business Entrepreneur

This shifts control of all resources needed to run the business to self and there is a big chance of messing up for lack of discipline. Early in the path of becoming a thriving Internet business entrepreneur, one must embrace the art of being inquisitive and develop passion to be an apprentice who can grasp anything fast. Dealing with websites is not easy if a person lacks the basic knowledge of using a computer or Internet for research and other things and as time progresses a need arises to take up the work of a web designer to reduce the costs.

That is translates to added efforts to learn basic HTML language, creating graphics, uploading files, tracking accounts and keeping records using software products and so on. Of course this knowledge should be gained secretly and diligently while consulting the employed expert and as soon as it happens one can then take on management of the business fully. When it is just beginning, overspending is inevitable yet it is a threat when the Internet business cannot breakeven or leave some surplus profits to pay salaries and expansion. In short, becoming a real Internet entrepreneur is taking a risk to appear like just a fool, failure or anything in order to gain knowledge and tricks needed to run the kind of online business niche. 

Although an entrepreneur is supposed to be a risk taker and an aggressive opportunist, it is prudent to realize that it is easier done offline, as people talk orally as opposed to online. Take caution on the kind of business deals or contracts to sign since this is one area where numerous offers that turn out to be scams exist. High risks deals may at times result to very high profits but should not be picked randomly yet at all times it is imperative to value personal dedication and sacrifice while avoiding such time wasting and costly shortcuts.

Get organized so as to value scheduling of every task for a particular day, check customer comments, enquires or anything and file them for reference and so on. Wasting time is not part of being a successful Internet business entrepreneur and this is highly likely to happen without screaming bosses around therefore one must note this. Avoid techniques that are sometimes thought to attract traffic such as loads of unsolicited email messages because this amount to Spam in most cases instead of website visitors.

Downtown Sarasota

Downtown Sarasota contains a small, walkable shopping and dining district a few blocks from the Sarasota Bayfront, east of Tamiami Trail. While Sarasota is a city, the sidewalks are not busy like most cities, unless there’s a farmers market or arts festival downtown. So it feels more like a small town during the day. At night, however, downtown Sarasota comes alive with people out and about, enjoying the many live music venues and restaurants.

Here are highlights of the various districts that make up downtown Sarasota.

FIRST STREET

The Sarasota Opera House, Selby Library, and Whole Foods Market Centre create a cultural and shopping spine along First Street. The Opera House, in soft tones of peach and cream, was extensively renovated last year. It sets a classical European tone and is very popular during Season. Ceviche Tapas Bar & Restaurant, First Street Chop House, Bijou Cafe, and Florida Studio Theater (on Palm Ave at First Street) are all situated in old buildings with character, forming a cozy downtown theatre district.

Diagonally across from the Sarasota Opera House is Selby Public Library, designed by Hoyt Architects. It floats like a big white circus tent supported by elephant-leg columns. At least that’s how it looks to this observer. Inside is a very modern, airy, natural-light-filled library with lots of Internet-capable computers, free wi-fi for using your own laptop, a spacious children’s section entered via an exotic-fishtank archway, and large collections of books, CDs, DVDs, periodicals, fiction and non-fiction books.

Whole Foods Market Centre incorporates upscale ground floor retail shops, upper-floor condominium apartments, a parking garage, and a Whole Foods Market with lots of outdoor seating. This is one of the best places in downtown Sarasota to enjoy a bite while you watch the passing scene. There’s a takeout food bar and an indoor cafe, too. Whole Foods Cafe and the Main Street corridor all offer free wi-fi in downtown Sarasota.

MAIN STREET

Stretching from Rte 301 on the east, to the Sarasota Bayfront on the west, Main Street is the spine of downtown Sarasota. The section between Rte 301 and Osprey Avenue is busiest during weekday business hours, as most of its business comes from office workers related to banking, law firms, and the courts, which are all concentrated in that part of downtown. On the corner of Main Street and Rte 301 is the Hollywood 20 Movie Theater complex. There’s a branch of the Sarasota YMCA in the same building.

From Orange Avenue west to Gulfstream Avenue, you’ll find an eclectic selection of international cuisine, from Greek to Spanish, Vietnamese to Thai, Chinese, Italian, American, French, Pan-Asian, and Fusion. There’s a health food store with supplements and a branch Post Office, art galleries, an Apple store with a cafe, bakeries, and clothing stores from women’s fashions to Brooks Brothers.

During Season, Main Street hosts many arts and crafts festivals, a biker rally, and celebrations of major holidays with rides and food vendors.

In the evening, you can bar-hop around Main Street, checking out the live music at numerous venues such as Mattison’s City Grille, Sarasota Vineyard, Pastry Arts, The Box Social, and The Gator Club.

LEMON AVENUE

Every Saturday, from 7AM to 1PM, year-round, Lemon Avenue from First Street to State Street is the epicenter of the Downtown Sarasota Farmers Market, where approximately 50 vendors offer oodles of fresh produce, including lots of organics; flowers and plants; arts and crafts; prepared foods to take home or take out; baked goods; gluten free foods; meats; and cheeses. It’s one of the best people-watching and dog-parading events in town.

The main downtown bus depot for SCAT (Sarasota County Area Transit) is located on the corner of Lemon Avenue and First Street.

STATE STREET

It’s easy to miss State Street, quietly perched one block south of Main Street. State of the Arts Gallery shows work by artists who are all local and self-supporting with their art. Much of the work shown there is large-scale, museum quality. On S. State Street, one block west, European Focus is a colorful shop with lots of intriguing gifts made by artisans in Europe. From “bouncies” — dolls that bounce up and down on springs — to French linens, to Bavarian “smokers”, to ceramics and tours of Europe, this is a unique Sarasota store. Next door to European Focus is Sarasota Candle, a local manufacturer that also has a booth at the Downtown Sarasota Farmers Market.

PALM AVENUE

This is downtown Sarasota’s “Gallery Row”, with everything from handblown glass to elaborate jewelry to paintings, sculpture, and hats. There’s a First Friday Artwalk that takes place along Palm Avenue from 6-9PM, when the galleries stay open late and offer refreshments and live music. Caragiulo’s Restaurant is on Palm Avenue, with indoor and outdoor dining. At the corner of Main Street and Palm Avenue, Epicure is a favorite spot to sit outside and relax with friends over lunch or dinner.

BURNS SQUARE

Burns Square, at the south end of Pineapple Avenue, is part of downtown Sarasota, but it’s separated by a two- block walk alongside non-descript office buildings, so it feels like a separate district. It shares the First Friday Art Walk with downtown. Here the buildings are low and charming with bright stucco colors and a changing array of intriguing shops. Awesome Orchids, Parkland Art Gallery, Malika’s Imports, L-Boutique, Jack Vinales 20th Century Classics, and Citrus Cafe are all worth a look. Behind Pineapple Avenue, Burns Court reveals Sarasota’s art film house, Burns Court Cinema, and Owen’s Fish Camp restaurant. On Saturdays, there’s a small, independent, outdoor artists’ market on Pineapple Avenue in Burns Square.

SARASOTA BAYFRONT

At the far east end of Main Street, Marina Jack restaurant and marina ties downtown Sarasota to Sarasota Bay. The restaurant is surrounded by the scenic Bayfront Park, which includes a walking path, children’s playground, O’Leary’s Tiki Bar & Restaurant, lots of free parking, yacht basin and small beach for launching rowboats. You can sit on a swinging bench and watch the tide go in and out, look across at the stunning John Ringling Bridge, or take in the glorious Gulf sunset.